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Ch. 6: Noteworthy Diamonds

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THE CULLINAN DIAMOND
world the pipe containing the " blue ground," along the longer diameter of its oval-shaped cross-section, measuring over half a mile, and its area ,is estimated at 350,000 square yards. This pipe breaks through felsitic rocks. The diamond, called " Cullinan " from the name of one of the directors of the company on whose farm it was discovered, was presented to King Edward on his birthday by the people of the Transvaal. It weighed no less than 3025J carats, or 9586-5 grains (1-37 lb. avoirdupois). It was a fragment, probably less than half, of a distorted octahedral crystal; the other portions still await discovery by some fortunate miner. The frontispiece shows this diamond in its natural size, from a photograph taken by myself. I had an opportunity of examining and experimenting with this unequalled stone before it was cut. A beam of polarised light passed in any direction through the stone, and then through an analyser, re77
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