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Ch. 7: Quartz Group - Opal, Rock Crystals, Amethysts, Rose Quartz, Agate, etc.

Ch. 7: Quartz Group - Opal, Rock Crystals,  Amethysts, Rose Quartz, Agate, etc. Page of 364 Ch. 7: Quartz Group - Opal, Rock Crystals,  Amethysts, Rose Quartz, Agate, etc. Text size:minus plus Restore normal size   Mail page  Print this page
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GEMS AND PRECIOUS STONES IN THE
ing 1885 was one remarkable mass that yielded a gem weighing 25 carats, of the deep purple color of the Siberian amethyst. (See Colored Plate No. 6.) Some fine amethysts have been found at Mount Crawford, Surry, Waterville, and Westmore­land, N. H. At Burrillville, and at Bristol, on Mount Hope Bay, R. I., fine amethysts were found, and used as ornaments, over sixty years ago. J. Adams says' that some were taken from a quartz vein in a coarse granite, and others were found in the sand at the foot of the hill at low tide. An amethyst nearly equal in color to the finest Siberian, and that would afford a gem nearly f inch across, was found a mile and a half from Roaring Brook, near Cheshire, Conn. When the West Shore Railroad tunnel at Weehawken, N. J., was being blasted out, there were found a few very fair specimens of amethyst on the trap rock. The finest one of these is in the State Museum at Albany, N. Y. Professor Genth * mentions magnificent specimens from Delaware and Chester Counties, Pa. Some of the principal localities are the townships of East Bradford, Pocopson, Birmingham, Charles-town (where about a quart of loose crystals was obtained), and Newlin (where about 100 pounds have been found, but none of it of gem value). W. W. Jefferies3 announced that amethysts of a rich purple color had been found in the northern part of New­lin Township. Crystals, of fine quality, though not affording gem material, one weighing 7 pounds, have been found in Upper Providence. Amethysts of large size, and with very perfect single crystals, well adapted for cutting, were found here in a vein of oxide of manganese and solid walls of sand­stone, quartz, and quartzite, often extending to a depth of over 25 feet. The finest, perhaps, of the crystals of this locality, was found in November, 1887. (See Colored Plate No. 6.) In these gems the purple coloring is unevenly distributed in the crystals, as in the case of the Siberian amethysts, both of which, when properly cut, disseminate the color in an unevenly tinted ame­thyst, making a rich royal purple tint equal to that of any known gem. As a precious stone the large crystal has little value, but
•Am. J. Sci. I., Vol. 8, p. 199, Aug., 1824.
2 Preliminary Report on the Mineralogy of Pennsylvania, p. 57.
3Proc. Acad, of Nat. Sci., Phil., Mineralogical Section, p. 44.
Ch. 7: Quartz Group - Opal, Rock Crystals,  Amethysts, Rose Quartz, Agate, etc. Page of 364 Ch. 7: Quartz Group - Opal, Rock Crystals,  Amethysts, Rose Quartz, Agate, etc.
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