Ch. 2: Platinum in 1922

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PLATINUM AND ALLIED METALS.                          131
with meshes not finer than thirty wires to the lineal inch in warp or filling, 25 per centum ad valorem; with meshes finer than thirty and not finer than ninety wires to the lineal inch in warp or filling, 35 per centum ad valorem; with meshes finer than ninety wires to the lineal inch in warp or filling, 45 per centum ad valorem.
Par. 353. Fountain pens, fountain-pen holders, stylographic pens, and parts thereof, 72 cents per dozen and 40 per centum ad valorem; Provided, That the value of cartons and fillers shall be included in the dutiable value.
Par. 399. Articles or wares not specially provided for, if composed wholly or in chief value of platinum, gold, or silver, and articles or wares plated with platinum, gold, or silver, or colored with gold lacquer, whether partly or wholly manufactured, 60 per centum ad valorem; if composed wholly or in chief value of iron, steel, lead, copper, brass, nickel, pewter, zinc, aluminum, or other metal, but not plated with platinum, gold, or silver, or colored with gold lacquer, whether partly or wholly man­ufactured, 40 per centum ad valorem.
Par. 1428. Jewelry, commonly or commercially so known, finished or unfinished, of whatever material composed, valued above 20 cents per dozen pieces, 80 per centum ad valorem; rope, curb, cable, and fancy patterns of chain not exceeding one-half inch in diameter, width, or thickness, valued above 30 cents per yard; and articles valued above 20 cents per dozen pieces, designed to be worn on apparel or carried on or about or attached to the person, such as and including buckles, cardcases, chains, cigar cases, cigar cutters, cigarette holders, coin holders, collar, cuff, and dress but­tons, combs, match boxes, mesh bags and purses, millinery, military and hair orna­ments, pins, powder cases, stamp cases, vanity cases, and like articles; all the fore­going and parts thereof, finished or partly finished, composed of metal, whether or not enameled, washed, covered, or plated, including rolled gold plate, and whether or not set with precious or semiprecious stones, pearls, cameos, coral, or amber, or with imitation precious stones or imitation pearls, 80 per centum ad valorem; stampings, galleries, mesh, and other materials of metal whether or not set with glass or paste, finished or partly finished, separate or in strips or sheets, suitable for use in the manu­facture of any of the foregoing articles in this paragraph, 75 per centum ad valorem.
WORLD'S PRODUCTION.
a In addition to the countries listed below, Victoria, Australia, reports 127 ounces for 1913. In 1915 Brazil exported 700 grams (23 ounces).
f» New South Wales Dept. Mines Ann. Repts.
c Tasmania Dept. Mines Ann. Repts. Tasmanian production all osmiridium.
a India Geol. Survey Rec.
« Production 0.31 ounce.
/ Estimate by J. M. Hill; Canada Dept. Mines Ann. Repts. give the following figures (believed low), 1913,13; 1914, none; 1915, 23; 1916,15; 1917, 57; 1918,39; 1919, 25; 1920,17.
g Estimate by J. M. Hill.
*■ 1919-1920, figures furnished by American embassy, Tokyo; 1921, consular report, Sept. 1,1922.
i Territory of Papua Mines Dept. Rept. Production osmiridium, year ending June 30.
PLATINUM DEPOSITS.
UNITED STATES.
In California about the usual quantities of platinum and osmirid­ium were recovered, the largest output coming from the dredges at the base of the Sierra and in Shasta and Trinity counties. A number of men were working with fair results on Peanut Fork of Cottonwood Creek, in northern Tehama County, and on Hay Fork of Trinity River, in the vicinity of Platina. Some details of the
Ch. 2: Platinum in 1922 Page of 54 Ch. 2: Platinum in 1922
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US Geol. Surv. 1922. Gemstones, Metals.
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